What's (in) the Picture?

Chris Breebaart Photography – finding stories

Posts tagged ‘Weekly Photo Challenge’

Afterglow 2

The Netherlands, Voorhout – May 2020

The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #97 is ‘pastimes’.

A last afterglow on the bulb fields. If you want to see flowers in bloom just check out the archives of flowers and Voorhout.

Shot with iPhone 11 Pro Max edited using Snapseed and Marksta Click the picture for a larger version

Afterglow

The Netherlands, Voorhout – May 2020

The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #97 is ‘pastimes’.

Normally the bulb fields attract tourists in the Spring. The colours are always fantastic to see. Let alone the smell. In The Netherlands we are in an intelligent lockdown since March 12th. To prevent people from flocking into the bulb fields the growers decided to chop the heads sooner than normal. After all the bulbs that are on the field are meant to be sold, you can order them online from August. The flowers are taking too much strength out of the bulbs, that is why they are chopped off after flowering. Last weekend we spotted two fields still in bloom, and decided to have a closer look on a bicycle ride. This is what we found.
If you want to see flowers in bloom just check out the archives of flowers and Voorhout.

Shot with iPhone 11 Pro Max edited using Snapseed and Marksta Click the picture for a larger version

Sunset over the field

The Netherlands, Katwijk – May 2020

The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #97 is ‘pastimes’. 
During the intelligent lockdown we can make short bicycle trips to have some excercise and see the beauty of nature bursting out in Spring. Yesterday I posted two motor powered parachutes against the sky. This is taken from the same viewpoint.

Shot with iPhone 11 Pro Max edited using Snapseed and Marksta Click the picture for a larger version

Sky Trip

The Netherlands, Katwijk – May 2020

The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #97 is ‘pastimes’. 
During the intelligent lockdown we can make short bicycle trips to have some excercise and see the beauty of nature bursting out in Spring. These two pilots take it to a higher level in their favourite pastime. Zooming in with the iPhone 11 Max gave this almost paint like rendering of the sky.

Shot with iPhone 11 Pro Max edited using Snapseed and Marksta Click the picture for a larger version

Proud Parents

The Netherlands, Oegstgeest – May 2020

We have a family of great tits as guests in our backyard. The parents fly in and out to feed the unseen – but quite vocally present – brethren. The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #96 is ‘cropping the shot’. Show how and why you crop shots, that is the basic question.

Basically I am not an avid cropper. Certainly in the days of film, cropping let always to the loss of quality. In digital times that is somehow different, especially using RAW format and a much better image capture technology. But in general: when taking the photo I try to frame it the way I want the final result to look like. Sometimes (digital is cheap) I take different frames of the same subject. But sometimes that is not possible.

In this photo – to close the series – a lucky shot of the two proud and very busy parents. I was focussing on one of them in the Wisteria, when the other came into the shot as well. The quality is not that great but it closes this series nicely.

 

Shot with Nikon D500, edited using Snapseed and Marksta. Click the picture for a bigger version

Stepping Out

 

The Netherlands, Oegstgeest – May 2020

 

We have a family of great tits as guests in our backyard. The parents fly in and out to feed the unseen – but quite vocally present – brethren. The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #96 is ‘cropping the shot’. Show how and why you crop shots, that is the basic question.

Basically I am not an avid cropper. Certainly in the days of film, cropping let always to the loss of quality. In digital times that is somehow different, especially using RAW format and a much better image capture technology. But in general: when taking the photo I try to frame it the way I want the final result to look like. Sometimes (digital is cheap) I take different frames of the same subject. But sometimes that is not possible.

In this photo the nest is on the back of our shed, and I can sit about 10 meters away, more or less hidden. Even using a long lens (300 mm on a not full frame sensor so approximately 450 mm) I can not get ‘close enough’. Because they are quite tiny, a distant shot is not that interesting to look at. Then cropping is a logical step to come up with a presentable result.

Yesterday I published ‘In Coming‘ that shows how one of the parents approaches the nest. Today a take off from the nest. It is relatively easy to record the departure from the nest: when you see the head, start using the burst and all chances are that you have one nice shot in flight.  To show you the amount of crop I added the original frame below.

Shot with Nikon D500, edited using Snapseed and Marksta. Click the picture for a bigger version

 

 

 

 

In Coming!!

The Netherlands, Oegstgeest – May 2020

 

We have a family of great tits as guests in our backyard. The parents fly in and out to feed the unseen – but quite vocally present – brethren. The theme for the weekly Lens-Artists Photo Challenge #96 is ‘cropping the shot’. Show how and why you crop shots, that is the basic question.

Basically I am not an avid cropper. Certainly in the days of film, cropping let always to the loss of quality. In digital times that is somehow different, especially using RAW format and a much better image capture technology. But in general: when taking the photo I try to frame it the way I want the final result to look like. Sometimes (digital is cheap) I take different frames of the same subject. But sometimes that is not possible.

In this photo the nest is on the back of our shed, and I can sit about 10 meters away, more or less hidden. Even using a long lens (300 mm on a not full frame sensor so approximately 450 mm) I can not get ‘close enough’. Because they are quite tiny, a distant shot is not that interesting to look at. Then cropping is a logical step to come up with a presentable result.

It is relatively easy to record the departure from the nest: when you see the head, start using the burst and all chances are that you have one nice shot in flight (see for an example here). In a shot like that you can zoom in quite close. Taking photos of the arrival to the nest is a bit more tricky. I found out that they come back using a certain pattern. They pause and sit 2 meters out on the wisteria, checking if returning is safe. But to catch them in flight I had to open up the frame a bit more. They are extremely quick and I can not see them take off for the final jump, so when I hear them I start using the burst, hoping it works out well. To show you the amount of crop I added the original frame below. A great tit in full brake.

 

Shot with Nikon D500, edited using Snapseed and Marksta. Click the picture for a bigger version

 

 

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